POST CATEGORY: Highly Likely

Highly Likely: Seth Rogen

December 10, 2017 | PacerStacktrain

The perpetually smirking canadian has made a career out of playing hardworking stoners we love.

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seth-rogen-quote1.jpgSeth Rogen’s “stoner comedian” persona is legendary. Seth Rogen is the reason Cannabis is legal in 29 states. Bear with me, and I’ll explain why this 30–something comedian from Vancouver, B.C. is the greatest force for the normalization of Cannabis in our lifetime.

Rogen relocated to the United States in his early twenties to pursue a career in Hollywood and lived in Portland for a short time. He landed a supporting role on Freaks and Geeks just prior to the show being cancelled and started writing, a talent that would serve him well throughout his career, for Da Ali G Show on HBO. He made his first appearance on film with a minor role in Donnie Darko.

His breakthrough role in film came in Judd Apatow’s debut film The 40-Year-Old Virgin, then Knocked Up and Funny People. In each of these films, the audience gets the feeling that Rogen is playing versions of himself, that’s part of what makes this actor so endearing and what makes him such a strong force as a Cannabis advocate.

It was around this time that Rogen met Evan Goldberg, who he would team up with to write some modern Cannabis film classics such as Superbad, Pineapple Express and This is the End.

In each of his films Rogen’s characters have Cannabis in common, and while many of his characters are your typical lovable teenage or 20-something stoner, Rogen and his partners make an effort to demonstrate that, while Cannabis is a good time, it’s ultimately not dangerous.

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Watch any interview with him and you’ll find that the actor and filmmaker talks about his Cannabis use casually and without a hint of shame. In fact, I get the feeling that we’ll look back on these interviews and this period of time as the beginning of the shift toward normalization.

On a recent episode of the now defunct Any Given Wednesday show on HBO, Rogen described one of his first experiences with herb to host Bill Simmons.

“In high school, there was a place run out of a guy’s basement that was an all-you-can-eat weed buffet. And you would pay $10 and there was the weirdest collection of people there. I remember the first time I smoked weed was like with a 65-year-old person. You would pay and they’d put out nachos, pizza, tacos made with weed. It was amazing,” Rogen said.

In 2014, when asked about how he would like to be perceived as a Cannabis user, Rogen told Rolling Stone “I consider myself more of a pothead than a stoner. A pothead has the connotation of being someone who just smokes a lot of pot and has stopped thinking about it.” Rogen added, “For the first few years that people smoke weed, they’re always trying to classify it and qualify it, ‘Is this bad weed, is this good weed, what is it doing?’ Eventually, it just is what it is, and I’ve been there for, like, 10 years. It’s so stupid, but I don’t think about it anymore.”

Rogen is an activist and a member of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws, where he’s advocated for legalization nationwide.

In a 2009 interview for Playboy, he lamented the hypocrisy of prohibition.

“When I first came to LA, I got caught smoking weed on a beach in Malibu and had to go to court. It was the craziest thing ever. I was thinking, ‘We’re in Los Angeles. There are probably 400 people getting murdered at this second, and these two cops are taking an hour to write up my court summons for smoking a joint on the beach.’ That just seemed so fucking ridiculous to me.”

Is Seth Rogen the reason the veil of Cannabis misinformation and prohibition is being lifted? Perhaps, though one thing is for sure: Rogen’s honesty and willingness to not be ashamed in public about his personal use is something that is needed from more individuals. Whether it was intentional or not, through Rogen and Goldberg’s characters: America started to see Cannabis as the innocuous, fun and often funny part of society that’s been marginalized for too long.

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